Congress votes away Internet privacy regulations in favor of ISPs
Following the Senate’s lead, the House has just voted to end Internet privacy regulations that would have required Internet service providers to get permission before selling a customer’s Internet data. The resolution will go into effect if Trump signs it; following the vote, the White House issued a statement saying the president’s advisors will recommend doing so. At the heart … Continue reading...
The White House is eager to sign broadband privacy deregulation into law
 Today, the White House issued its full-throated support for a joint resolution that would repeal regulations limiting what internet service providers can do with the private data of their customers. The rules, introduced under the Obama administration last year, stipulated that an ISP must obtain opt-in permission to use and share (i.e. sell) consumer’s private data, including… Read More ...
Google is fighting with Symantec over encrypting the internet
 Google, which has accused Symantec and its partners of misissuing tens of thousands of certificates for encrypted web connections, quietly announced Thursday that it’s downgrading the level and length of trust Chrome will place in certificates issued by Symantec. Encrypted web connections — HTTPS connections like those on banking sites, login pages or news sites like this one… Read More ...
Social media firms facing fresh political pressure after London terror attack
 Yesterday UK government ministers once again called for social media companies to do more to combat terrorism. “There should be no place for terrorists to hide,” said Home Secretary Amber Rudd, speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr program. Read More ...
Microsoft Docs.com sharing site “accidentally” exposed files
Uploading files and documents to cloud services is so common these days that users don’t give a second thought about the process. They presume a level of security and privacy that these services offer. Sometimes, however, those presumptions can be proven terribly wrong, as what users of Microsoft’s document sharing service, Docs.com, found out the hard way. Apparently, it was … Continue reading...
CREDO and Cloudflare argue against national security letter gag orders
 Earlier this week, the FBI finally allowed Cloudflare and CREDO Mobile to identify themselves as recipients of national security letters, which allow the agency to secretly order tech companies to hand over customer data. (The FBI initially allowed Cloudflare and CREDO to disclose some but not all of their NSLs; TechCrunch reported in January the two companies had received additional NSLs… Read More ...
Senators reintroduce a bill to improve cybersecurity in cars
 Senators Ed Markey of Massachusetts and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut have reintroduced the Security and Privacy in Your Car (SPY Car) Act of 2017. The SPY Car Act places the onus for automotive cybersecurity and privacy standards on the shoulders of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Federal Trade Commission. Read More ...
The FCC is talking about everything but the imminent repeal of its internet privacy rules
 It was a productive meeting at the FCC: Chairman Pai talked about putting pressure on phone scammers, preventing phone smuggling in prisons, and improving mobile service. But one thing he didn’t want to talk about was the vote taking place in the Senate that very moment that would overturn privacy rules bigger and more important than anything on the agenda. Read More ...
Senate debates permanent rollback of FCC’s broadband privacy rules
 Republican Senators led by Arizona’s Jeff Flake proposed a resolution earlier this month that would roll back privacy rules adopted by the FCC last year that prevented ISPs from collecting personal data without asking permission first. Today the Senate was alive with oratory as people spoke for and against the proposal. Read More ...
Court: Claiming you forgot your decryption password can be contempt of court
A US Third Circuit Court of Appeals in Pennsylvania has upheld a ruling that found that refusing to decrypt a hard drive for police, even if you’ve forgotten the password, is considered contempt of court. The post Court: Claiming you forgot your decryption password can be contempt of court appeared first on Digital Trends....
Beijing deploys facial recognition to foil toilet paper thieves
Talk of facial recognition tends to settle around either concerns about privacy or the security systems used at events to spot potential terrorists. China, though, has deployed the technology in Beijing for a different reason: to catch toilet paper thieves. The thieves are (were?) stealing toilet paper from public toilets, something made much harder thanks to modern dispensers with facial … Continue reading...
Marine Corps updates social media guidance to address online misconduct
 As its revenge porn scandal continues to unfurl, the Marine Corps took steps this week to bolster its standards for online behavior. Following a hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Marine Commandant Gen. Robert Neller signed off on a set of guidelines that expand the definition of sexual harassment to include online activity. Just like with offline infractions, Marines deemed… Read More ...
Backblaze has some advice if you need to destroy the data on an SSD
How to destroy the data on an SSD is an important question today when so much of our private information is stored both locally and in the cloud, and cloud storage and backup solutions company Backblaze has some advice. The post Backblaze has some advice if you need to destroy the data on an SSD appeared first on Digital Trends....
UK watchdog “close” to verdict in DeepMind Health data consent probe
 The UK’s data protection watchdog has said it’s “close” to concluding a 10-month+ investigation into consent complaints pertaining to a patient data-sharing agreement inked between Google-owned DeepMind and the Royal Free NHS Trust which operates three hospitals in London. Read More ...
Instagram is the latest nexus of the Marines photo sharing scandal
 Following the revelation that a private Facebook group with 30,000 members targeted female Marines in a non-consensual photo sharing ring, other toxic online communities are popping up — and proving that the Marines United scandal is by no means an isolated incident. This week, a group known as Just The Tip Of The Spear, commonly abbreviated JTTOTS, was booted from Instagram for… Read More ...
WhatsApp and Telegram security flaw: Here’s how hackers make malicious images and take control
Check Point, an Israel-based cyber security company disclosed a serious flaw in popular messaging apps like WhatsApp and Telegram that could allow hackers to take over their accounts. All that was required by the attacker was to send a malicious image file to the victim. As soon as the victim clicked the image, the attacker could control the victim’s account. There are several important things to note about the attack. Even though the flaw has been fixed by WhatsApp as well as Telegra...
Google’s Allo messaging app might be sharing your searches
Google's Allo messenger might be inadvertently sharing personal information like your work address and search history. A Google Assistant bug is to blame, it seems, though the exact cause isn't clear yet. The post Google’s Allo messaging app might be sharing your searches appeared first on Digital Trends.
Sir Tim Berners-Lee warns of the threats to today’s web
 Sir Tim Berners-Lee doesn’t issue too many proclamations, but those he does are usually quite sensible. The latest, occasioned by the 28th anniversary of Sir Tim’s paper proposing the World Wide Web, warns of the three primary threats to the ecosystem that web has into. Read More ...
Can your smart home be used against you in court?
 First responders found a body floating in a hot tub. The home’s resident, James Andrew Bates, told authorities he’d found the body of Victor Collins dead that morning. He’d gone to bed at 1 AM, while Collins and another friend stayed up drinking. Authorities subpoenaed Amazon over the case — they hoped Bates’s Echo might hold some insights into what happened the… Read More ...
Can your smart home be used against you in court?
 First responders found a body floating in a hot tub. The home’s resident, James Andrew Bates, told authorities he’d found the body of Victor Collins dead that morning. He’d gone to bed at 1 AM, while Collins and another friend stayed up drinking. Authorities subpoenaed Amazon over the case — they hoped Bates’s Echo might hold some insights into what happened the… Read More ...